Blue Jays MLB Draft Update

With the MLB draft less than a month away, Crosscheckers and Scouting Directors are criss-crossing the country, getting more detailed looks at players recommended by Area Scouts.

Auburn’s Casey Mize has had a dazzling spring, and while he’s not the consensus #1 pick, he should be headed to the Tigers.

With their first pick at #12, the Blue Jays have been linked to several players.  Jonathan Mayo of MLB Pipeline has South Florida LHP Shane McClanahan going to Toronto with that choice.  McClanahan was viewed earlier this spring as a possible first overall pick, but his stock has dipped to due to command problems.  A 2016 Tommy John patient, McClanahan has added strength during his collegiate career, and has lit up radar guns across the south, hitting 100, and sitting 92-98 with movement.  McClanahan throws a change which projects as a plus pitch, and a slider that is inconsistent.  He’s fanned an impressive 15.1/9 this year, but has also walked 5.3/9.  The development of that third pitch will determine whether his future lies in a starting rotation or a bullpen.

Baseball America published their latest mock draft yesterday, and they have the Blue Jays taking South Alabama OF Travis Swaggerty.  Scouting Director Steve Sanders was on hand to watch Swaggery recently.  BA describes him as having five tools, and he’s put together a proven track record in the Sun Belt Conference.  Swaggerty is also young for his draft class (he won’t turn 21 until August), which the Blue Jays put a premium on as an indicator of the likelihood of future success .

ESPN’s Keith Law has the Blue Jays selecting Stetson RHP Logan Gilbert.  Long and lanky with a bowling ball fastball that has heavy sinking action, Gilbert is Nate Pearson-sized, who is described as athletic, with clean mechanics.  Mississippi LHP Ryan Rolison has had an inconsistent spring, but is still seem by some as one of the top southpaws in the draft.

The Blue Jays have been linked to a couple of high schoolers with their first pick.  Florida  OF Connor Scott, Georgia RHP Ethan Hankins (who was viewed as a possible 1-1 pick before a minor shoulder issue intervened earlier this spring), Arizona 3B Nolan Gorman, and from their backyard, Mississauga’s Noah Naylor, whose stock has risen this spring have all been linked at one time or another to Toronto.  Naylor certainly has the bloodlines, but if past history is any indication, the Blue Jays will shy away from all of these players with their first pick.  Five of their first six selections (and 13 of their first 14) were college players, and that as much as anything indicates that they’ll lean in that direction.

 

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MLB Draft Preview: Logan Gilbert

Stetson RHP Logan Gilbert has that long, lanky frame (6’6″/210) that teams covet in a Pitcher.

With a bowling ball sinking fastball that sits at 95, a curve that’s projectable, and a change that shows promise, Gilbert was talked about as one of the top college righties before the season started.  Toss in five double-digit strikeout games already this season, and you’re riding a rocket to the Top 10, or maybe just outside of it – like to #12, where the Blue Jays will select.

With a loose, easy delivery, Gilbert fills the strike zone.  His size allows him good extension, and some late life on that fastball.  A 3rd Baseman for much of his high school playing career, he’s still relatively new to Pitching.  Gilbert was the Atlantic Sun Conference Pitcher of the Year last year, and was ranked the 5th best prospect in the Cape Cod League last summer.  He was also a pre-season All-American.

2080baseball.com’s evalutation:

Tall, lanky frame with long arms and room for growth; no windup, minimal step-in to motion; long-armer through a 3/4’s slot; loose, live arm and he throws free and easy; ball explodes out of his hand; double-plus fastball (93-to-97 mph), comfortably sitting 95 mph with plus movement, explosive late life; heavy sink action with hard run and tail; true swing-and-miss pitch; projectable, plus curveball (74-to-76 mph) with two-plane action and solid depth; must stay on top of curveball more consistently; seldom used changeup (84-to-85 mph) with solid fade; plus performance seen on July 18, where he worked five innings giving up two hits, one walk and eight strikeouts. Will be one of the premier right-handed college pitchers for the 2018 Draft.

After fanning 10 over 8 innings in his most recent start last night, and taking a no-hitter into the 7th the start before that, Gilbert is climbing many draft boards.  Jeff Ellis of scout.com loves Gilbert, and sees him continuing to rise:

Gilbert is one of the half a dozen or so arms that are in the top ten discussion. He needs to continue to rack up performances like this if he wants to stay in the upper tier of arms. I see a potential front of the rotation arm. I still have him as my number two college right-hander in this class and think he is likely going to be a steal when the draft occurs.

Gilbert checks many boxes with the Blue Jays with his size, college background, velocity, and remaining projection.  If he continues this ascent, he may not be around when it comes their time to select, but he would be a very nice fit.

MLB Draft Preview #2 (From a Blue Jays Perspective)

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Tristan Pompey – The K Zone photo

The Blue Jays are in a “sweet position” to grab a premium college Pitcher or Outfielder with the 12th pick in June’s draft, according to a noted amateur talent evaluator.

Jeff Ellis, the lead MLB draft analyst at Scout.com (you can read his most recent mock draft here), feels that given the preferences shown by the Blue Jays over the past two drafts, it’s more than likely that their top choice will come from the draft’s deep pool of arms or Outfielders.  After last year’s draft, Blue Jays Director of Amateur Scouting Steve Sanders did agree that the longer track records of college players fits their draft preferences better than high schoolers, at least when it comes to their top picks.

Ellis feels this year’s draft may top the previous several years when it comes to depth:

I think we’re seeing more depth than in the past few years, which is surprising, because with the pool system I think we’re seeing less elite talent make it to the college ranks but I think college coaching on the whole has improved significantly, so we’re seeing more players get developed properly

The players that seem to fit the Blue Jays and their past history, according to Ellis, are Travis Swaggerty of South Alabama, Griffin Conine of Duke, and the Greater Toronto Area’s own Tristan Pompey of Kentucky in the Outfield, while Pitchers Ryan Rolison of Mississippi, Jackson Kowar of Florida, and Logan Gilbert of Stetson appear to have the right mix of skills and potential availability for the Blue Jays to consider.  Over the next week, we’ll profile each one of these players in more detail.

Baseball America released their Top 300 draft prospects last week, and had Florida HS Pitcher/Catcher Mason Denaburg ranked #12.  BA’s list, however, is not a mock, and it would be unlikely that the Blue Jays would select Denaburg, both given their aversion to prep players at the top of the draft, and the depth of Catching prospects they currently have in their system.

Ellis liked the Blue Jays draft last year, for the most part:

They took more players from my big board than any other team. They would often take guys one or two spots ahead of where I had them, so I like the players they took, but I didn’t love where they took them.

One thing that’s interesting about Conine, Rolison, and Swaggerty is that they’re young compared to the rest of their class.  The former pair doesn’t turn 20 until July 11th, while Swaggerty doesn’t until August.  More and more teams, according to Ellis, are using age relative to draft class:

When you look at a lot of guys in the minor this probably no better indicator of  when a player is significantly younger than the level he’s at and he’s finding success there – you have that extra time for development, and some teams just really buy into this.

Ellis feels that there’s enough depth in this draft that the Blue Jays will probably be able to land a premium talent in the second round (with the 52nd pick).  With their second pick last year,  Toronto stepped out of their college-player mode, and picked California two-way player Hagen Danner.  Danner was not that much of a reach, though as Ellis pointed out, “Danner fits with their approach because he was a Little League World Series hero and he’s been on their track record forever.”

As the draft progresses, Ellis suggests that the Blue Jays will be on the lookout for players with good track records whose stock has fallen this year.  Ryan Noda was thought to be at least a 3rd round pick last year, but a mediocre college season dropped him to the 15th round.  Noda, of course, tore up the Appalachian League, flirting with .400 until the final weeks of the season.

The Blue Jays value production, and the above names have proven histories in that regard.  After doing a decent job of restocking their system over the past two drafts, the Blue Jays have a chance to add some potential impact talent to their prospect base this year.